Warbow wales Historical Events

Laminated or any wood self longbows with any type of string are acceptable for accuracy events

jeremy wand shooting

(Left) Wand shooting is usually shot at shorter distances and therefore at a flatter trajectory
(Right) A modern reconstruction by Brain Lee (Below) The cleaved wand but Ian sturgess.

warbow wales cleaving the wand

According to John M. Kistler, in his book ‘Animals in the Military’ A knight mounted on a destrier would close with the archer’s at 25 mph and would reach them in just over 6 1/2 second from 80 yards and a 6 mph man-at-arms on foot in 34 seconds. If the archer’s nerves held there may perhaps time for approximately 3 arrows at the latter and just time to pick up mêlée weapons in the former. This is assuming the archer was unprotected but stakes, pit-falls or caltrops. Although not under this sort of pressure, the man-sized target provides hard data about standard of accuracy for sustained shooting at mid range.

warbow field shoot
IMAG0695-1

(Right) Broadheaded arrows are being shot from heavy bows to cause massive haemorrhaging and stay impaled in the stags. Image from the British Library
(Left) Nowadays, the quarry is of the plastic foam variety and broadhead (or duckbill as they were also known) are never used as they damage the targets too severely. However, a good appreciation of the skills needed for medieval bow hunting can still be had with no harm to animals.

"In my time my poor father was as diligent to, teach me to shoot, as to learn me any other thing; and so I think other men did their children, he taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms, as other nations do, but with strength of the body: I had my bows bought me,according to my age and strength; as I increased in them, so my bows were made bigger and bigger, for men shall never shoot well, except they be brought up in it: it is a goodly art, a wholesome kind of exercise, and much commended in physic

Al shooting Welsh yew

In the Tudor period, the swan song of military archery, flight competitions were held with both livery (issued military arrows) and bearing arrows. The latter was ‘tuned’ distance arrow. Valuable prizes were given to the winners. It is a salutary thought that distances of over 400 yards are recorded from shoots on Finsbury Fields during this period.

Therefore Warbow Wales will hold distance or flight shooting with period tackle to test ‘strong shooting in the bow’

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